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Equine C.A.R.E.

Helping the Forgotten and Unwanted Horses of Kentucky

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Nothing defines the culture of Kentucky better than the state's passion for horses. One visit to Kentucky's horse country complete with lush rolling hills of bluegrass, beautiful barns and peacefully grazing horses and it's easy to see why we are internationally known as the Horse Capital of the World. 

In 1884, the Kentucky Humane Society (KHS) was founded to advocate for water troughs for carriage horses in Downtown Louisville. While our primary focus in recent years has been dog and cat welfare, and we are the largest pet adoption agency and largest no-kill shelter in the state, we have not forgotten our equine roots.


KHS has made a commitment to find solutions for neglected, abused, or abandoned horses in Kentucky, and to ultimately reduce the number of unwanted horses that may wind up in bad situations in the future. There is an overwhelming need to assist horses; rescues are overcrowded, funding is limited for county shelters to house equines, laws are antiquated, and education about responsible horse care is lacking in many circumstances. This scenario often leaves horses in tragic and helpless situations, and has even resulted in a free-roaming population of domestic horses in parts of our state.

 

Equine C.A.R.E. (Connect, Assist, Rescue, Educate)

equineCARElogo-webIn 2015, KHS launched our Equine C.A.R.E. (connect, assist, rescue, educate) Program to focus on helping the companion or recreational horse, as this fits our mission to advocate for the humane treatment of all companion animals. Equine C.A.R.E. priorities include moving horses from crisis into safe homes or rescue, providing re-homing services to horse owners who can no longer keep them, matching available horses with adopters, implementing gelding and wellness clinics, and making educational tools and resources available to our equine community.

In 2015 our Equine C.A.R.E program was part of a diverse coalition that successfully advocated for reducing Kentucky's stray-hold period for horses from 90 days to 15 days. This law is designed to protect at-risk free-roaming horses. Learn more

 

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