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UPDATES: Kentucky Humane Society Supports Animals and Shelters Impacted by Eastern Kentucky Flooding

HOW TO HELP

The best way to support the shelters and animals in Eastern Kentucky is to make a monetary donation directly to shelters in the region or KHS, or to adopt or foster from KHS or Louisville Metro Animal Services.

Donate to the Floyd County Animal Shelter (Dewey Dam) here.

Donate to the Kentucky River Regional Animal Shelter here.

Donate to KHS here.

Order tie-outs from our Amazon or Chewy wish lists. KHS distributes tie-outs to Eastern Kentucky families so that fewer dogs are lost.

Adopt or Foster

We expect more homeless animals from Eastern Kentucky who need shelter and care to arrive in Louisville in the aftermath of the flooding, increasing the strain on our local shelters that are already at capacity. We ask the community to help us clear our local shelters by adopting or fostering now from KHS or Louisville Metro Animal Services so that we can help as many animals as possible from Eastern Kentucky.

Adopt or Foster at the Kentucky Humane Society

Adopt or Foster at Louisville Metro Animal Services

IF YOU NEED HELP

Please contact your closest animal shelter.

UPDATES

Update, August 26, 2022

KHS Transports 120 More Animals From Eastern Kentucky Shelters Impacted by Flooding

This week, we transported 120 more homeless animals to KHS from shelters in Eastern Kentucky that continue to be overwhelmed in the aftermath of the deadly flooding. It has been nearly 30 days since the floods, and there are hundreds of homeless animals in the region’s shelters. More are expected to arrive as displaced animals continue to be brought in and families are forced to surrender their pets in the aftermath of the flooding. As we find loving homes for the animals in our care, place them in foster homes, or transport them to shelters that have room for them, we will continue to return to Eastern Kentucky to bring back even more homeless animals. We also continue to support the shelters with needed pet food, supplies and financial aid and deliver food and supplies to the region’s pet owners.

The cats, dogs, puppies and kittens are being cared for at our KHS Pet Retreat in Jeffersontown, which we use for large-scale rescues and national disasters, and our Fern Creek Pet Resort. We are coordinating with our shelter partners and the ASPCA to transport some of the animals to shelters that have room for them, including the Lexington Humane Society, over the next few weeks. Others will remain at KHS until they are ready for adoption or fostering. Meanwhile, each animal is being medically assessed and receiving care and love from the dedicated KHS staff.

To date, we have transported over 250 cats, dogs, puppies and kittens to KHS from Eastern Kentucky shelters impacted by the flooding, including Kentucky River Regional Animal Shelter in Hazard Kentucky, the Floyd County Animal Shelter in Prestonsburg and Dumas Rescue in Garrett. All the animals were up for adoption prior to the flooding, surrendered by their owners, or past their 30-day disaster stray hold. After the flooding, the shelters extended their stray holds from 5 days to 30 days to make sure families have the time to be reunited with lost pets.

The Eastern Kentucky community continues to hurt. We will continue to do everything we can to help the shelters and animals in the region, including transporting out as many homeless animals as possible and providing food, supplies and manpower.

Update, August 18, 2022

KHS Takes in Over 100 Shelter Animals from Flooded Eastern Kentucky Communities

To date, KHS has taken in over 125 animals from Kentucky Regional River Animal Shelter (KRRAS) in Hazard, which serves animals in Perry, Breathitt, Knott and Letcher Counties, and Floyd County Animal Shelter (FCAS). All animals were in shelters before the storms, and by removing them, local shelters have space for incoming lost and injured animals. A number of these unwanted animals were then moved out to animal shelters in Connecticut and Colorado so they can be placed for adoption.

KHS has also provided financial assistance to KRRAS, FCAS and Dumas Rescue, a Floyd County nonprofit that is leading the efforts to distribute food and supplies to pet owners in hard-hit communities. KHS donated over $7,000 of crates and tie-outs to help keep pets with their families and, thanks to food donations from Greater Good Charities and Chewy, KHS has sent in thousands of pounds of dog and cat food. A $25,000 grant from PetSmart Charities and $20,000 grant from Petco Love are allowing KHS to continue to provide lifesaving veterinary care, food and supplies to needy dogs and cats in impacted counties.

“The amount of devastation is almost unfathomable,” said Lori Redmon, CEO of KHS, who has heard stories from residents of cats, dogs and horses swept away by the waters. “Kentuckians are suffering, and when people suffer, so too do the animals.” KHS plans to continue to transport in more homeless animals from Eastern Kentucky, as space in its shelter and its shelter partners allows.

*******The Kentucky Humane Society transported more than 100 animals from shelters in Eastern Kentucky to KHS on July 30, helping make room in the shelters for animals displaced or injured by the flooding. The animals came from the Kentucky River Regional Animal Shelter (KRRAS) in Hazard and Floyd County Animal Shelter (FCAS) in Prestonsburg and were up for adoption prior to the flooding. KHS also delivered needed supplies to the shelters and is providing financial aid to KRRAS so it can rent a vehicle to transport additional animals outside the region.

KHS transported 13 dogs and puppies and 36 cats and kittens from FCAS to KHS’ Sam Swope Pet Treatment and Lifesaving Center (Main Campus). Eighteen dogs and puppies and approximately 30 cats and kittens from KRASS came to KHS’ Sam Swope Pet Retreat in Jeffersontown, with an additional six dogs transported to KHS’ Willow Hope Farm in Simpsonville. All the animals are being medically assessed and will remain at KHS until they are ready for adoption or fostering. KHS uses its Pet Retreat as an emergency staging center for animals coming from large-scale rescues.

“Many animals will be lost or injured by the floods, and others will be surrendered as families struggle in the flood’s aftermath,” said Karen Koenig, Vice President of Animal Welfare for KHS. “By taking in the animals that were in their shelters before the flooding, KHS is helping make room for them to focus on their community and reunite lost pets with their families.”

HOW TO HELP
We expect more homeless animals from Eastern Kentucky who need shelter and care to arrive in Louisville in the aftermath of the flooding, increasing the strain on our local shelters that are already at capacity. We ask the community to help us clear our local shelters by adopting or fostering now from KHS or Louisville Metro Animal Services so that we can help as many animals as possible from Eastern Kentucky.

The best way to support the shelters and animals in Eastern Kentucky is to make a monetary donation directly to the shelters:
Donate to the Floyd County Animal Shelter here.
Donate to the Kentucky River Regional Animal Shelter here.

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